DAVID GRAY | L.A. SALAMI | 24.03.2019 | Gateshead Sage | REVIEW and PHOTOS

DAVID GRAY | L.A. SALAMI | 24.03.2019 | Gateshead Sage | REVIEW and PHOTOS

David Gray | L.A. Salami – 24th March 2019 – Gateshead Sage

Review and photos by Victoria Wai (Victoria Wai)

L.A. Salami started the night with many in the room not having a clue who he was prior to this gig but he definitely had many talking by the time his set ended. One person even muttered, “It’s actually nice to hear someone sing something with actual real meaning.”

A tune plays in the background at a nice volume as people settled for showtime. Unsure if people thought it was a part of the show but it definitely felt like it and as soon as the figures appear on stage and a hello from David Gray comes there’s a huge cheer as The Sapling from his latest album, Gold In A Brass Age, opens the show.

The show itself feels huge. It’s a sell-out this night. All bodies are still and silent. As a write this, I have read again and again about people talking at gigs being a big no-no and I totally agree. The odd whisper is good but not through the whole show and at a volume where you can’t hear the artists and this night it seems all but that one woman are in agreement. I don’t know if it is because it’s a Sunday or because of the grand venue we are in and the music of David Gray not being of the ‘beer swigging’ standard. This is not a bad thing and this is not a negative reflection on the audience as at every song change the claps and vocal appreciation feels electrifying. They just seemed in awe with every second Gray and his band give us this night of music. But good on that woman whooping and trying to get the venue clap along at the appropriate moments, though deep down I think she wanted it the whole night.

Back to David Gray though. His (and the band) performance was such a calming experience. It was one of those perfect gig moments where you get lost for a few hours and everything feels right in the world no matter what subject matter is being sung about. Until this moment I have only ever seen Gray on television with a guitar or behind a keyboard. I have never seen him do what he did this night. He was loop peddling between guitar swaps – huge nod to the guitar tech doing the swiftest of changeovers and allowing Gray and band to smoothly carry on. As he starts, A Tight Ship, he sings into his ukulele to capture a sound then quickly takes up his place behind the keyboard with no note missed. What a moment especially for a first-timer of a David Gray show. Other moments include Gray letting loose and busting a few moves which could definitely have given Elvis a run for his money.

We are given a ‘solo’ section, not that Gray really needs it as from the second he stepped on the stage he owned it, even though the backing band are fantastic, it is a wonderful part of the show which includes Snow In Vegas that was a duet with LeAnn Rimes from his 2016 Best Of album, his 2002 hit The Other Side and a Bob Dylan cover One Too Many Mornings. This is also the moment where Gray does the most talking as he mentions his grandfather being from South Shields. The biggest cheers come with The Other Side and it is no surprise that other songs from that era also get this reaction – Sail Away came earlier in the night.

When the band rejoin Gray on stage, a few more amazing numbers come from his current album but his ‘biggest hits’ close out the night in the form of Babylon with This Years Love and Please Forgive Me in the encore which really gets the crowd on their feet….and you wonder why they just didn’t do this from the start….however it’s also good that they didn’t – one reason because I may have been the shortest person in the room and secondly people really got to sit back and take in every moment in admiration of David Gray and it really was that kind of night where you appreciated the silence and be in awe of art.

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KT TUNSTALL | LAUREL | 11.03.2019 |  Gateshead Sage | REVIEW and PHOTOS

KT TUNSTALL | LAUREL | 11.03.2019 | Gateshead Sage | REVIEW and PHOTOS

KT Tunstall and Laurel – 11th March 2019 – Gateshead Sage

Review and photos by Victoria Wai (Victoria Wai)

What I absolutely love about both the support act and headliner on this night is that there are no airs and graces but pure passion and appreciation of being able to do what they do for an audience that has gathered, who are also just as appreciative of what they see before them. With each drop of the ‘f-bomb’ it is done so with so much love.

Laurel is starting to make a name for herself and has been touring the more intimate venues for a few years. She admits that she is a huge fan of headliner KT Tunstall and is thriving on every moment given to her. The last three times I have seen her the crowds have been somewhat rowdier but the Sage crowd is quite a contrast that the first ‘f-bomb’ of the night is dropped as she is amazed by the attentiveness. The only time it gets really loud is when she and her band shout the ‘yeah’ bit in Lovesick.

Laurel has an instant connection with the crowd that when she introduces South Coast someone asks where she is from. Jokingly her instant reply is ‘the south coast,’ but then she says Plymouth and the crowd cheer which is some feat as this gig is in the North East. The volume is tripled as she introduces the last song Adored as the audience want her to stay a longer. Showing their appreciation at the interval there is a never ending queue for her at the merch stand.

KT Tunstall – 11th March 2019 – Gateshead Sage

A booming ‘Hey Micky’ comes as the room darkens then appears the lady of the night KT Tunstall and with a quick hello the members of her band join her to open with the song that is wrote on her white guitar, Uummannaq Song. She narrates that we are in a Sage shaped space ship travelling to the furthest side of the world before starting ‘Other Side Of The World.’ Tunstall is quite clever like this and we get these soundbites throughout the night that lead into her songs. There is also a personal connection in that she talks of the rivers of “Gateshead and surrounding areas” reminding her of home as well as those “clear blue skies then stepping out and it’s like fuuuccckkk!” She maybe LA based now, but she still talks like a true Scot.

There is so much energy in the air and true or not the band slip off twice for their ‘beer break’ and Tunstall is on the stage alone, just her with a guitar, a loop pedal and a tambourine then later a harmonica. She says most people probably spent their hard on cash to see her because of the song that has now become a ‘karaoke classic’ that she couldn’t be more proud of as she can now buy a few rounds of drink. The way she plays Black Horse And The Cherry Tree is one of those special moments where it feel like it is just you and her in the room even when the room is clapping along leading into the band coming back and a mash-up huge loud mash up with the classic hit Black Betty is played.

Although Tunstall has a stellar back catalogue we also get some from her latest release Wax with Little Red Thread being a personal favourite on the night visually. We get back-to-back of The Night That Bowie Died, Dark Side Of Me and The Mountain as she asks for us all to just get lost in the music. Besides the claps in between each song the room obliges and is still as we let her do her thing. What a moment. But being KT Tunstall we go out on a with the heavy rockier song ‘The Healer’ before she is off and the crowd call for her back.

The crowd is rewarded with ‘Invisible Empire’ and a rendition of Tom Petty’s ‘Won’t Back Down,’ which makes the room still and silent once again and it is such a beautiful moment. I could watch and listen to Tunstall perform this way all night but her vibrant soul is also something to be witnessed and it probably couldn’t be more fitting that the night ends with ‘Suddenly I See’ and those that were sitting before that were invited to stand earlier in the night were right up on their feet with everybody else in the room. If only Sage had room for those big streamers this was the moment for them as the band leave the stage and Tunstall runs and hand slaps those at the front with a big shout of “we totally love ya.” That feeling is echoed back to her as the venue empties.

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JOHN PAUL WHITE and LYLA FOY | 27.01.2019 | Gateshead Sage | REVIEW and PHOTOS

JOHN PAUL WHITE and LYLA FOY | 27.01.2019 | Gateshead Sage | REVIEW and PHOTOS

John Paul White and Lyla Foy – 27th January 2019 – Gateshead Sage

Review and photos by Victoria Wai (Victoria Wai)

John Paul White
John Paul White – 27th January 2019 – Gateshead Sage

John Paul White, a musician in his own right, but also known for his part in the musical duo The Civil Wars returned to Gateshead Sage for the third time and first time as a solo act. We were in for a stripped back acoustic treat and the audience could not have been any more appreciative.

Arkansas Dave kicked off the night interestingly in a different room to where the rest of the performances were held. Bringing a livelier and louder affair to the Northern Rock Hall. On hearing and seeing what was happening it made sense. Arkansas Dave had a full band with him and they belted out big sounds that had the room stomping their feet, which was a huge contrast to the next few hours ahead.

Lyla Foy - 27th January 2019 - Gateshead Sage
Lyla Foy – 27th January 2019 – Gateshead Sage

Lyla Foy was the main support for this whole tour with John Paul White and the audience gathered over to Hall 2 for the rest of the night. For those familiar with Lyla, what normally backs her music on stage is an electric guitar and keyboards, though as she took to the stage what was before us was a small keyboard and an acoustic guitar. If this was your first time seeing this ‘sub-pop’ artist then this was just as new for you as it was for those familiar with her material and it was, in simple terms, stunningly breathtaking. I have seen Lyla a number of times but this night it was like a whole new Lyla Foy was forming in front of me and the audience were also on her side that unless prompted to talk they were hanging on to her every word until her last note.

With a very quick changeover of ten minutes the audience gave a rapturous applause as John Paul White stepped onto the stage to kick off the night with new song, ‘I Wish I Could Write You A Song’. He stands centre stage throughout the night with just his guitar, he needs nothing more to make this show any more powerful than it is. The crowd is silent and there are a few tears being wiped from the outset, probably just as much as his kids felt when he sings of his love/hate relationship being on the road away from them with ‘The Long Way Home.’ As if the night could not make you tearier, he then performs ‘James’ which was inspired by Glen Campbell but written for his father.

He tells us of his upcoming release which is, he jokes, is of course called ‘The Hurting Kind,’ which sends a laugh throughout the audience. That is what is noticeable with John Paul. He can break our hearts and have us crying with his deliverance but he then comforts us in between the songs with this chat that has us laughing. What a character he is. He also later quips that a request came in for ‘Hey Jude,’ and you could ‘feel the pain’ from the audience but luckily it was a joke and he actually gives us a cover of the Dan Seals, ‘Everything That Glitters Is Not Gold,’ which also subconsciously made him the artist he is today rather than the rocker he dreamed of being. Another cover comes at the end of the night with ‘Can’t Get You Outta My Head,’ from his favourite band ELO which gets a nod of approval from the crowd and a rapturous applause once again and with a few screams leads for him to return to the stage for a finale with ‘This Life,’ a special kind of John Paul White love song.

John Paul White gave us everything and the audience of Sage 2 could not have been more perfect. In fact, he says we are “so sweet and quiet, (and does) not take it for granted…it’s actually quite terrifying.” As a gig-goer, when I am at these kind of gigs, this is all I could ever want. Though there was one thing missing for me personally. John Paul gave his support act Lyla Foy a shout out as they happen to duet on a song on her latest album, Bigger Brighter, called ‘Bring Flowers’. I am unsure how many people knew of this prior to the gig, but I knew and when it was mentioned I thought we were going to see it brought to life with both of them on stage but it wasn’t to be. It would have been a perfect addition to a perfect night, so maybe one day it will be.

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ANOTHER SKY | BETH MACARI | TALK LIKE TIGERS | 19.01.2019 | Gateshead Sage | REVIEW and PHOTOS

ANOTHER SKY | BETH MACARI | TALK LIKE TIGERS | 19.01.2019 | Gateshead Sage | REVIEW and PHOTOS

 ‘New Year New Artists’ with Another Sky, Beth Macari, Talk Like Tigers, Nick Roberts – 19th January 2019 – Gateshead Sage

Review and photos by Victoria Wai (Victoria Wai)

Sage Gateshead hosted ‘New Year New Artists’ from 17th-20th January to celebrate, ‘the UK’s most exciting contemporary musicians,’ from folk, classical, jazz, world music and indie, with Blank Slate covering the Saturday night programme that was hosted by BBC Introducing North East.

A wonderful noticeable thing of the night, is that the three acts: Talk Like Tigers with their electro-pop, Beth Macari with her funk-soul vibes and Another Sky with their dark, cinematic sounds, helped to pull in an audience of varying age proving that music really does bring people together, as throughout all three acts the majority of the audience remained.

Nick Roberts, presenter of BBC Introducing North East provided tracks to warm us up and entertained between sets. Some did wonder if he was presenting his show on BBC Newcastle at the same time as it was a noticeably North East soundtrack.

Twin duo Talk Like Tigers opened the night, harmonising tightly over electro pulsating beats from their simple set-up and slightly choreographed moves. They are very sleek and engaging throughout with their catchy numbers that have the crowd dancing, even to slightly darker sounding sounds.

Beth Macari has a powerful voice, backed by a funky band. I have seen Beth in the past and it was apparent that there was something there, but it has been a while since I have seen her perform live and tonight, I was left with my mouth on the floor as it seems she has gone from a solid 8 to a 12/10 in my books. She has a charisma that matches her music and her band is just as engaging. If you want to dance and be blown away a night with Beth Macari could do it.

Headliners of the night were London four-piece Another Sky with bassist Naomi being the North East connection. They first came to my attention when they supported Laurel on her tour late last Summer. Catrin’s voice has won critical acclaim and that is what captured me first. I almost likened them to a dark and heavier version of London Grammar, who I love but I couldn’t have been more wrong. Yes, that voice is deep like Hannah Reids and the music is atmospheric but that is where the comparison ends…that is if anyone has ever found that comparison bar me!

Another Sky then took a leap forward with an appearance on Later with Jools Holland, which seems is why many of the audience were there on this night. Of the three acts Another Sky’s set seemed more intense but in a different way of that term as many of the audience actually stood further back from the stage to get a fuller scope of every band member. They have an energy I cannot quite describe yet but every member is remarkable. Stereotypically, many people want to be up close to musicians in this environment – Another Sky had us wanting to feel the atmosphere of the whole room that people were moving their bodies in the shadows and the back actually became more cramped than the front! It was a case of you had to be there. It might have been a one-off and I am glad I witnessed it. Dark, intense and atmospheric might be the way I could describe Another Sky. However, whatever, I say put them on your ‘ones to watch’ list.

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65DAYSOFSTATIC – Decomposition Theory tour and Gateshead Sage gig  | INTERVIEW

65DAYSOFSTATIC – Decomposition Theory tour and Gateshead Sage gig | INTERVIEW

65daysofstatic talk to us about the Decomposition Theory tour and upcoming Gateshead Sage gig

We spoke to Paul Wolinski about their fascinating new show and the process behind the music.

65daysofstatic - Boiler Shop Newcastle - December 2017
65daysofstatic – Boiler Shop Newcastle – December 2017

65days shows are already well known for being intense audio/visual immersive experiences and you have set the bar pretty high judging by your last Newcastle show at the Boiler Shop in December 2017! Can you give an idea of what to expect at the Decomposition Theory shows?

Thanks. That show was a nice way to finish off the touring we had been doing for our last record, which was the soundtrack to No Man’s Sky. Although that project as a whole was a leap forward to us in terms of music-making (because we wrote an infinitely-long, interactive soundtrack for the game), in terms of the live show, all that algorithmic/generative material got turned into fixed forms to better fit with the regular 65daysofstatic live show. Because usually, our shows are like how other bands do it – a few new songs alongside a lot of material from our back catalogue.

Decomposition Theory is a sharp break from that approach. It’s a different live set-up, and it’s us putting these new techniques front and centre, meaning there’s no back catalogue, it’s all about the new stuff. This isn’t a permanent state of affairs, but something we felt we wanted to try. The shows also have a big visual element too, we’ve made visuals that are very directly tied to the generation of the music, with the intention of making the process a little more visible to the audience.

Can you give us an insight into the songwriting/algorithm creating process? Is it totally electronic or do you have human input too?

It’s entirely human. All algorithms are inherently biased by the human/s who designed them. Ours are only different in that we leaned into that bias rather than worked under the illusion that algorithms could ever be natural. I’d say lines of code have about equal weighting to guitar pedals within the band at this point. Plus we are not dogmatic about this. We have no interest in becoming ‘the algorithmic band’. It’s not a gimmick, it’s just another tool we wanted to get good at. When the algorithms produce rubbish, we step in and try to make it better.

Will the performances be unique musical pieces?

This was the intention although as we’ve now done a few more shows, we notice that a lot of the music is solidifying. It’s becoming more like each show has unique iterations or remixes of the same songs rather than producing entirely new material. This is partly by design and partly because we don’t want to accidentally turn into a more electronic Spinal Tap circa their free-jazz improv period, with us just smashing out insane generative beats in 17/8 time that nobody can dance to. We always try to remember that unique does not automatically equal good. Especially when it comes to music.

What inspired the Decomposition Theory project?

It was a long time coming and involved too many factors to go deep into here. Decomp is not really an endpoint for us and although it’s a loose name for this collection of shows, really it’s more of a methodology that we’re trying to apply to everything we do as a band. I guess we want to antagonise the form of what a band can be, to challenge those expectations a little. It’s not about redefining 65, it’s more about escaping definition altogether. To make ‘being a band’ a process rather than a fixed state. This shows, the algorithmic approach, that’s really just one manifestation of what we’re thinking about these days as a group.

Should we expect any of your recorded material on the tour?

No. In the (very) unlikely event that any old material surfaces, it’ll be in some new weird, liquid form.

What’s next for 65days, any recording plans?

Yeah, probably but do you think that anybody can really reliably say what they’re going to be doing next at this point in civilisation??

65daysofstatic - Boiler Shop Newcastle - December 2017
65daysofstatic – Boiler Shop Newcastle – December 2017

65daysofstatic bring their Decomposition Theory show to Gateshead Sage on 24th November 2018

HAWKWIND | 20.10.2018 | Gateshead Sage | REVIEW and PHOTOS

HAWKWIND | 20.10.2018 | Gateshead Sage | REVIEW and PHOTOS

Hawkwind – 20th October 2018 – Gateshead Sage

By Gordon Armstrong (G’s Gig Shots)

About 3/4 way through the show as orchestra and band brought the epic Zarzorinia to a spectacular close having built it up to a mighty crescendo I blurted out “F**k me! That was outstanding!“ and to be fair those 5 words could easily be my “review” and I’d stand by it! But I best tell you a bit more…

I’m not gonna lie, I’ve only ever dabbled in Hawkwind and only know the odd track here and there despite them having always been a part of my musical history. So when I was asked if I would like to cover this I was a little apprehensive but I am always up for broadening my horizons. This is the second gig in almost as many weeks that I’ve been to with a “rock“ band being accompanied by an orchestra in the Sage. It’s a perfect venue for it though where every instrument can be heard balanced with each other providing a massive rich sound The orchestra set the scene with the opening of Assault and Battery conducted by Mike Batt (yep THE Mike Batt Of Wombles fame) as each member of the band take their positions before joining in and taking this 1975 classic to new heights!

Throughout the two hour set the visuals, as expected at a Hawkwind show, are as important and upfront as the music. Lasers, back projections, a myriad of coloured lights all come together with each track adding but never detracting from the music. Guesting on the mic is legend Arthur Brown in his trademark face paint and various costumes and especially on Sonic Attack his spoken word assault on the senses coupled with the bombastic mix of band and orchestra is quite nerve shattering! The return to a straightforward rocking Damnation Alley following it is like a breather.

The band played a few without the orchestra through the set, but for me, it was the combination of the two that really worked and going back to my first paragraph Zarozinia will possibly be one of the best band/orchestral performances I’m likely to witness! Whilst they are known as a “space rock” outfit it’s easy to forget that there are also some lovely intricate vocal numbers in their catalogue as well like We Took The Wrong Step Years Ago and Have You Seen Them both aired tonight.

Set closer Arrival in Utopia is the last to feature the orchestra and the band return to get the crowd to their feet for an encore featuring Spirit of the Age and yep, of course, Silver Machine!

Dave Brock may well be the only original member in the band but the chemistry he has with Richard Chadwick (drummer now for last 30 years) and Magnus Martin (guitar/ keys/vocal) and Niall Hone (bass/keys) (much respect to him too playing the set whilst ill) you’d think they’d been together from the start !

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STEVE HACKETT (Genesis Revisited) | 07.10.2018 | Gateshead Sage | REVIEW and PHOTOS

STEVE HACKETT (Genesis Revisited) | 07.10.2018 | Gateshead Sage | REVIEW and PHOTOS

Steve Hackett Genesis Revisited with The Heart Of England Orchestra – 7th October 2018 – Gateshead Sage

By Gordon Armstrong (G’s Gig Shots)

The lights go down at 7:30pm and I’m trying to remember how many times that I have seen Steve Hackett since that Spectral Mornings tour all those years ago. The count is swiftly put to one side as the familiar melody and drum salvo intro of Dance On A Volcano kicks off this first of the evenings two sets. The six-piece already look comfortable and why wouldn’t they be having the back up of a 41 piece orchestra belting out behind them!

This tour is unique in that sense as it’s the first Genesis Revisited tour where Steve has taken out a full orchestra on tour Steve to take these timeless classics to a new level! Oh, my word it works more than you can try and explain in words!

Solo career tracks Out Of Body and The Steppes follow the Genesis opener and the latter of the two is just incredible. The orchestra adds so much cinematic quality and depth to this desert-themed tune it just soars!! Back to the archives and a track that if anyone else had in their catalogue it would be an encore or at least a set closer it’s such a fantastic piece Firth of Fifth. This is an absolute showstopper of a performance Nad Sylvan is probably the best I’ve seen him his confidence is just spot on hitting every note but as ever it’s THAT solo from Steve that leaves jaws on the floor!

Nad Sylvan

Bolstered by the strings and brass of the orchestra this time it just feels so new and exciting and has everyone wondering how they can follow that for the rest of the night! Dancing With The Moonlit Knight that’s how!!! From the Selling England album (which Steve is performing in full on next years tour) Nad yet again shines delivering some of (in my opinion) Gabriel’s finest lyrics ever with ease and dramatic flair! That’s not to say the band have it easy this track, in particular, has a lot going on and builds from a folk song like intro into a mad mix of time signatures handled with ease by the rhythm section of Gary O’Toole & Jonas Reingold on drums and bass respectively! Gary is featured on the more gentle Blood On The Rooftops before set one closes with a HUGE sounding Shadow Of The Hierophant receiving a standing ovation before a deserved interval!!

The double hit of Wind & Wutherings’ In That Quiet Earth & Afterglow gets the second set well and truly underway featuring Rob Townsend (Sax, flute, percussion) at the centre of it all. As the fade out into Afterglow kicked in it felt like the only thing missing was those old Boeing landing lights that created that iconic image of the band in photos of old.

Two more solo tracks Serpentine Song (written about Steve’s father) and the percussive El Niño are up next the latter showcasing Steve’s guitar work and various techniques to the max. Possibly progs most ambitious track closes the set … yep Suppers Ready, in all of its 29-minute glory every segment performed to perfection. I just sat immersed in the whole thing, the orchestra not only bolstering but adding so much more to its grandeur.

The final segment with Steve’s wailing solo, accompanied by 46 other musicians is something I won’t forget. This for most would have been enough but nope they return for the classic Musical Box with Roger King providing those familiar keyboard riffs around the sinister nursery rhyme tale and ferocious guitar work. A standing ovation on three tiers and rightly so. I have always said Hackett is an unsung hero of the guitar but those who know… know! Early in the set, Hackett said this tour was like all his Christmases in one and we were lucky to be a part of his early yuletide joy!

Massive praise to the Heart Of England Orchestra who absolutely nailed the arrangements Their conductor Bradley Thachuk led them brilliantly he was so into the performance turns out he grew up on rock and prog before going down the classical route so this was like his dream gig.

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MARK LANEGAN AND DUKE GARWOOD | 01.10.2018 | Gateshead Sage | REVIEW and PHOTOS

MARK LANEGAN AND DUKE GARWOOD | 01.10.2018 | Gateshead Sage | REVIEW and PHOTOS

Mark Lanegan and Duke Garwood – 1st October 2018 – Gateshead Sage

By Gordon Armstrong (G’s Gig Shots)

The gig was split into two sets with Lanegan & Garwood performing their albums Black Pudding and their latest release With Animals in their entirety one album per set I always think it’s a brave move doing an album in full but doing two is even bigger a risk. However, they pulled it off beautifully! Mark Lanegan has a voice I have loved for years in his various projects and it was on fine form this opening night of the UK tour. I’ll admit I wasn’t too familiar with the Black Pudding album but I really enjoyed the feel of each track especially Death Rides A White Horse and Cold Molly. It felt like these songs should be heard in the desert around a fire as Garwood’s hypnotic guitar drew you in and Lanegan’s vocal held you there! At times it was very trippy especially when Lanegan added to the other three members guitars and keyboards by taking a violin bow to a guitar set up like a double bass. It felt like the Shamen scene in Natural Born Killers at one point!

The second set of With Animals I was more familiar with as I’ve been listening to the album quite a bit lately. Again multi-instrumentalist Duke Garwood was at the core of every song providing rich tones and melodies for Mark to provide his delivery over. Title track With Animals was outstanding, but I could be biased as I’ve had the refrain from that going round in my head since first listen so hearing it loud and live just topped it off!!

Save Me & Feast to Famine are also two of the finest album and gig openers you could want for this style! It’s always an impressive sound at the Sage even more so when the whistling duet between Mark and Duke at the close of Lonesome Infidel is crystal clear. It suddenly dawned on me that everyone was hanging on every note and unlike a lot of gigs of late there was no (or very little) talking from audience members which is a testament to the performers.

An encore of I am The Wolf & Burning Seas (Mark and Duke solo songs) sees the night out and whilst not a concert of visual proportions (two lights red and blue) and not a lot of interaction apart from a couple of thank you’s, I think musically it’s a show that will stay with a lot of people for some time.

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